Padmavati: The myth or legend?

With the release of the trailer of this high budget, much awaited movie, Padmavati, has come the flood of comments praising how wonderful and grand the whole trailer looks.

Now I don’t have any issues with it being told as a folklore, or for entertainment purposes of the majority hindu audience, just as the intended poem written by Malik Muhammad Jayasi (a muslim poet, some 200 years after khilji’s death). But this must be made clear to the audience just as the poet himself did at the end of his poem. It must be made clear that its based on the poem and its not supported by any historical facts.

It must also be noted that while Ranveer Singh looks just as savage as a ruthless villain should look like, Alauddin Khilji was not at all like that. He certainly did not have a waxed chest or six abs like Ranveer and certainly did not eat raw meat. He can easily be defined as one of the most successful Muslim rulers in India and he expanded his sultanate in all directions from Delhi in a very short span of time, defeating on Hindu Raja after the other. Yes, the Hindus might say that he plundered and looted (and Muslims might argue that he was not unkind with slaves and was just with spoils of war), but thats what happens in wars: the winner gets all; women included.

Attacking Chittor was probably just part of the expansion plan. It seems rather unrealistic and unreasonable that someone like Alauddin would have attacked Chittor for a woman he had never even seen. Rani Padmi might have become an important part of spoils of war for him if she stayed alive but a woman, no matter how beautiful she might be, would not have been the reason for siege for an ambitious ruler like Alauddin who didn’t even spare his own uncle.

Probably I won’t be watching this movie (just like last 5 movies by Sanjay Leela Bhansali) but I would urge everyone to please read a little about Alauddin Khilji as a ruler from History books and not just judge him from a movie based on a poem written only for entertainment purposes.

PS: Ranveer looks hot tbh, but there is shahid kapoor as well in the movie 😉

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Naml….

I never realized that ants have been given so much importance in Islam. Not only there is a whole surah about ants in the quran, I just found out that Hazrat Ali (AS) also spoke about them in great detail.
Below is part of the Sermon 185 from the Nahjul Balagha that is about ants.

“Look at the ant with its small body and delicate form. It can hardly be seen in the corner of the eye, nor by the perception of the imagination – how it moves on the earth and leaps at its livelihood.  It carries the grain to its hole and deposits it in its place of stay.  It collects during the summer for its winter and during strength for the period of its weakness.  Its livelihood is guaranteed, and it is fed according to fitness.  Allah, the Kind, does not forget it and (Allah the Giver) does not deprive it, even though it may be in dry stone or fixed rocks.

If you have thought about its digestive tracts in it’s high and low parts, the carapace of its belly, and its eyes and its ears in its head you would be amazed at its creation and you would feel difficulty in describing it. Exalted is He who made it stand on its legs and erected it on its pillars (of limbs). No other originator took part with Him in its origination and no one having power assisted Him in its creation. If you tread on the paths of your imagination and reach its extremity it will not lead you anywhere except that the Originator of the ant is the same as He who is the Originator of the date-palm, because everything has (the same) delicacy and detail, and every living being has little difference.”

Why, oh why? [Women and Masjid (Pakistani Perspective)]

Growing up in a family like mine, I never realy felt any biases against myself due to my gender. I had the same curfew time and went to the same educational institutes like my brother. I learned to drive pretty much the same time and interesting both of us were taught to offer salah by our grandfather too. In fact, a lot of the times it was my brother who thought I always got the advantage, being a girl, and got away with a lot of things and now wen I think back, I cant really deny that completely 😛

But as I grew older and started going to Pakistan more often (and then later lived there), I realized, things were ‘culturally’ very different from what I had been taught at home and from what I had learned from books. I am not saying that Islam really differs too much between the two genders, but the difference is way too visible in the predominantly so-called Islamic State. You know, as it is said, if you want to understand Islam, look at Islam itself and not Muslims. This saying started to become a reality for me.

Soon, I found out there is not a single masjid nearby where women could go to pray if they wanted to. Funny. Yes, I am a Hanafi and I always knew that Prophet Mohammed (SAW) encouraged women to pray at home but did that mean women are not allowed into the masjid at all? I started digging for answers and interestingly, I found a hadith which says:

Hazrat Abdullah bin Omar (RA) narrates that the Messenger of Allah (SAW) said, “Do not prevent your women from attending the masjid, even though their houses are better for them” [Sunan Abu Dawood]

Not bad at all! This was all very logical…something I knew already but just didnt know from where it came. Praying at home is better for women but Islamically, men could not prevent women from praying at the masjid. The meaning was straightforward: a masjid is supposd to provide proper facilities for women at masjid and then it is upto the women whether they want to go or not.

Now, talking about fiqh. Hanafis are usually the most strict wen it comes to women praying at the masjid and as it is the predominant fiqh in Pakistan, I really needed to know whether it is something cultural or Hanafis really believe that going to masjid is, in fact, haram for women. I found the following:

Hazrat Aisha (RA) has been reported to have said, “If the Messenger of Allah (SAW) was alive to see what women are doing now, he would surely have prevented them from entering the masjid for prayer just as women of Banu Israel were prevented” [Sahih al-Bukhari]

Now the above is simply an opinion by Hazrat Aisha (RA), not a ruling. It is also of common knowledge that Hazrat Omar (RA) prevented women from attending masjid for prayer as part of the law during his reign without making it part of the religion itself. Futher, the fatwa on this matter must be scrutinized far more carefully:

“It is disliked for women to attend congregational prayers in the masjid even for Eid and Juma prayers, and even for old women attending night prayers, according to the more reliable position in Hanafi School, due to the corruption of time.” [Imam al-Haskafi, Radd al-Muhtar ala al-Durr, 1/566]

So, again, it is disliked and not considered haram as the common misconception in Pakistan. Further, if you look at the Hanafi rules, you will in fact find various laws regarding how a woman should behave in a masjid if she is having her periods. Now , if according to Pakistani jurists, women are not allowed in the masjid at all, why do we need to talk about wat a women should do if her periods start when she is in the masjid?

And then at times I think, if women are allowed to go freely to markets, lawn exhibitions, fashion shows and social gatherings where men and women intermingle, often (not always obviously) in the most un-Islamic manner, then how can going to masjid be considered haram? Sadly, in a country like Pakistan, even the most religious women often have to miss their prayers because they were either stuck in a traffic jam or were buying essentials at a market. You would be shocked to know that most shopping malls in Pakistan do not even have a prayer room for women and interestingly, most shops remain closed till around 1 in the afternoon.

So what are women supposed to do?

Well, I guess just wat they have been doing so far…prayers can wait!