Procrastination

No its not Twitter, Facebook or Google Buzz. It might be for the youth but for the majority of Pakistanis, its politics. And arent we always asking the most stupid questions. Here are some of the most commonly discussed unsolved questions and my answers (you dont obviously have to agree to them 😛 ):

Should Pakistan have been created?

It was created more than 6 decades back. Can we talk about improvement instead?

Kashmir hamara hai.

LOL. Is that a joke? We have already lost half of our country. We are finding it difficult to hold on to wat we are left with. What will we do with a part of land which is not ours yet?

Pakistan should be an Islamic State.

It was established as Islamic Republic of Pakistan in 1973 constitution.

Free judiciary (a.k.a. CJ mafia’s authority) will make Pakistan the most democratic, crime free country in the world.

Oh yea? Keep dreaming. It has only established a criminal, who attempted to murder the COAS, the most ‘trustworthy’ and ‘respected’ person in the country.

Only Khilafat-e-Rashida can save us.

Like Khilafat-e-Rashida saved the Khalifas themselves? I think we need to remind ourselves that both Hazrat Usman (RA) and Hazrat Ali (RA) were murdered by the so-called Muslims only. We only deserve people like Zardari to rule us.

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11 thoughts on “Procrastination”

  1. I do agree that we have much bigger issues to solve than discussing if Pakistan should have been made, and even bigger issues than discussing if Pakistan has free judiciary or not, but these issues do need to be discussed. Judiciary for example, needs to be looked into. Kashmir issue needs to be decided, these issues, though only indirectly, do impact the issues that need our immediate attention…

  2. Like Khilafat-e-Rashida saved the Khalifas themselves?

    True. But in this statement, I didn’t really get your point. Should Khilafat not have happened? Is Khilafat not a sound system of governance? Or you’re just saying that Khilafat is not the solution?

  3. @ Haris
    I dont know why but it seems that watever we have thought of to be the solution, in fact becomes a bigger threat itself. Most of the Pakistanis started to believe that Iftikhar Ch. would perhaps bring the golden time of Hazrat Umar (RA) which was such a huge mistake. We have to understand that wat we need is free judiciary and dependency on the system, wat we did instead was to politicize a man and thats it.
    Secondly, as for Kashmir, yes its an issue that cant linger on for decades to come. We need to solve it. Quickly. But not by using the methodology we have adopted so far. we have only created problems for ourselves: the most important ones having to spend so mch on our army and now to deal with TTP.

    @ minerva
    🙂

    @ fatima
    thanks darling 🙂

    @ Uni
    I am not against Caliphate at all. I just dont think we can deal with it or deserve it in the very first place. First of all, it is important to understand that Khilafat-e-Rashida was an immediate solution engineered by the Sahabas and we arent talking about any Sahabas, we are talking about Hazrat Umar (RA) and Hazrat Abu Bakar Siddiq (RA). The four righteous Caliphs were people who the Prophet (SAW) held closest to himself during his life: he married the daughters of two of them and married three of his daughters to the other two. They were all great analysts, strategists, politicians and Hazrat Ali (RA) was even a very brave warrior. So obviously, there is just no doubt on their capabilities as leaders for the Ummah. But wat did the Ummah do to them? There was a civil war during the reigning period of Hazrat Abu Bakar (RA), half of Hazrat Usman’s (RA) and the whole of Hazrat Ali’s (RA) reigning periods are marred by civil wars.
    Now coming back to my point, I did a post some time back (u can read it here), and a reader (Brickwall) gave a comment which I really liked. I am not quoting exactly wat he said, but something which I understood from his comment: the society was very very primitive wen the four rightly guided caliphs were ruling, they had an edge over others because of their intimacy with the Prophet (SAW) himself and yet had to face oppositions which they dealt with by waging wars. Secondly, over time things have changed. We now cannot just fix each and everything exactly the way they were done by the Sahabas, Tab’eens and Tab’a Tab’eens. As Brickwall phrased it beautifully: “It would be extremely imprudent to search for justification of concepts phrased in the terminologies of modern political thought through the prism of Islamic jurisprudence or history.”
    And finally, if we’l find a good leader, we wont let him stay, we’l kill him (or her) ourselves like we always have. We first need to improve our own very selves and then expect the society to improve and then finally expect to have good leaders.

  4. There was a civil war during the reigning period of Hazrat Abu Bakar (RA), half of Hazrat Usman’s (RA) and the whole of Hazrat Ali’s (RA) reigning periods are marred by civil wars.

    True. But they didn’t give up that system of governance did they? It continued – till 1920 at least. (correct me if I’m wrong here – but Khilafat was there till the Ottomans).

    We now cannot just fix each and everything exactly the way they were done by the Sahabas, Tab’eens and Tab’a Tab’eens.

    Agreed. Waisay, it’s funny our army is following this course of action. Dealing with insurgents by waging war on them.

    And finally, if we’l find a good leader, we wont let him stay, we’l kill him (or her) ourselves like we always have.

    True again. But that’s what I’m saying. Hazrat Umer (RA) was hurt with a poisonous spear, Hazrat Usman was martyred by rebels etc. But that’s my confusion — they did NOT give this up. There has to be a rational explanation for it then.

    We first need to improve our own very selves and then expect the society to improve and then finally expect to have good leaders.

    Again, a confusing point. It’s very well to say that we need to improve. But under whose guidance? Zardari? This ‘improving’ process can’t be done with anarchy or leader-lessly.

    Now you may ask, where will the leader come from? The leader surely will come from the society – there aren’t all idiots left here you know. Which again, justifies the concept of ‘working towards Khilafah’ — something you’re opposing.

    Do you understand my confusion regarding your statements?

  5. I still do not understand your confusion because I, myself, did a post on Pakistan army’s war against the TTP and how it matches with Hazrat Ali’s (RA) war against the Khawarij. In fact I also linked it to my previous comment. I hope you have read it and know what I have written.
    Now, coming to the point of giving up the system of governance because it had certain problems. I am not saying we should give it up because we cannot give up something which we do not have. We have a so-called democratic system, we can talk about either giving that up or improving it.
    We need to decide wat we want exactly, i think we wanted democracy just two years back. we were protesting for elections, we got them and we have put up the most corrupt person in the country as our president…lets face it, people voted for his party. whether they were sympathy votes or anything, he did get the votes and he is a democratically elected president. We wanted democracy by ousting the military dictatorship. Now as we all know Pakistan was established as a democratic country for Indian Muslims, which is a completely different form of governance as compared to Caliphate. Caliphate was not democracy. It had more similarities to military dictatorship. In fact, you might know that the Khilafat movement (1919-1924) in India was something which was very strongly opposed by Jinnah and hugely supported by Gandhi.
    Secondly, we do not need to be completely dependent on our leaders for each and everything. If not all, some pakistanis are surely educated and can think for themselves. We cannot just sit at home, keep blaming anarchy in the country and do nothing to improve our very own selves. Who knows, one of us might be a leader for the youth in coming years. Who knows, it might be you.
    We all know that the Prophet (SAW) did not say much about the form of governance after his death, something which led to the divide amongst Muslims with in a few days after his death only. I am not against Caliphate itself because, as I mentioned above, it was engineered and approved by the Prophet’s (SAW) closest companions but we must understand that we need to improve wat we have right now which is crippled democracy. Democracy is, after all, wat has made an African American with a muslim middle name the President of the United States.

  6. I am not saying we should give it up because we cannot give up something which we do not have.

    Sure. But you’re talking about not going for ‘this’ particular idea at all – and I’m questioning it 🙂

    We have a so-called democratic system, we can talk about either giving that up or improving it.

    Already established that pure democracy doesn’t work here. It didn’t work pre-Mush and it hasn’t worked post-Mush. Since dictatorship is out of question (and btw, Caliphate may resemble a dictatorship structure wise, but surely you’re not replacing one with the other right?), what’s left?

    We cannot just sit at home, keep blaming anarchy in the country and do nothing to improve our very own selves.

    I’m not at all against improving our own selves. You’re very right there. But I do not understand how this and this alone will help? Without having any political awareness/inclination/striving/struggle?

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